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Ireland

About Country

Ireland is situated in the Atlantic Ocean and separated from Great Britain by the Irish Sea. Half the size of Arkansas, it occupies the entire island except for the six counties that make up Northern Ireland. Ireland resembles a basin—a central plain rimmed with mountains, except in the Dublin region. The mountains are low, with the highest peak, Carrantuohill in County Kerry, rising to 3,415 ft (1,041 m). The principal river is the Shannon, which begins in the north-central area, flows south and southwest for about 240 mi (386 km), and empties into the Atlantic.

In the Stone and Bronze Ages, Ireland was inhabited by Picts in the north and a people called the Erainn in the south, the same stock, apparently, as in all the isles before the Anglo-Saxon invasion of Britain. Around the 4th century B.C. , tall, red-haired Celts arrived from Gaul or Galicia. They subdued and assimilated the inhabitants and established a Gaelic civilization. By the beginning of the Christian Era, Ireland was divided into five kingdoms—Ulster, Connacht, Leinster, Meath, and Munster. Saint Patrick introduced Christianity in 432, and the country developed into a center of Gaelic and Latin learning. Irish monasteries, the equivalent of universities, attracted intellectuals as well as the pious and sent out missionaries to many parts of Europe and, some believe, to North America.

Norse incursions along the coasts, starting in 795, ended in 1014 with Norse defeat at the Battle of Clontarf by forces under Brian Boru. In the 12th century, the pope gave all of Ireland to the English Crown as a papal fief. In 1171, Henry II of England was acknowledged “Lord of Ireland,” but local sectional rule continued for centuries, and English control over the whole island was not reasonably secure until the 17th century. In the Battle of the Boyne (1690), the Catholic King James II and his French supporters were defeated by the Protestant King William III (of Orange). An era of Protestant political and economic supremacy began.

Why Study in Ireland

Ireland is a part of European Union and is a very dynamic and modern country with a young population of 40% population below 25 years and one of the fastest growing economics in the world, with population of 4.33 million. The country also boasts the highest quality of life in the world, ranking first in the Economist Intelligence Unit's Quality-of-life index. Ireland has topped a list of the World's Friendliest Countries in a survey drawn up by the Lonely Planet travel guide group.

Accepts student's for post graduation with 15 yrs of education, unlike some countries. One of the best education systems in Europe (2004 IMD World competitiveness Report) with a history rich in tradition and learning. Quality education leading to rapid growth of economy. It has 4.4% unemployment rate.

  • 1 year master's degree
  • No prior work experience required for MBA
  • International Students can work Part-time (approximately 20 hrs/week)
  • Excellent wages: € 8-9 per hr
  • Government policy on investment in research to develop Ireland as a knowledge society.
  • Close links between educational institutions & thriving economy.
  • Temperate climate. It rarely drops below freezing and snow is uncommon.